mamma-kandeh(JollofNews) – I write to you as a concern citizen, to engage you on a matter at hand, relating to efforts to unite Gambia’s opposition for the forthcoming Presidential elections slated for December 1st 2016.

I followed that on Friday October 14th 2016, the GDC withheld signing the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) as issued on the Press Release, based on mistrust, method of selecting a flag bearer, and that your suggestion of “an open primary” was not considered by GOFER (Courtesy of GDC’s Deputy Leader, Mr. Yusupha Jaiteh, 10/14/2016, Gainako and Diasporium).

I also followed previous and subsequent interviews on Freedom Radio, Gainako, and Fatu Radio conducted with Mr. Jaiteh and GDC Diaspora Group. As I am writing this letter, I also have the Press Release issued by GDC’s party Secretary, Essa Jallow, before me for review. In your interviews with Freedom, GDC argues that it is appealing to the APRC supporters, and so far capable of taking away 36% from the APRC base and predicated that the GDC will pull at least 50% of the overall votes in the Presidential elections. Exciting right!  I do not question your gauge method, however I would like to caution that, these numbers could be in fact tricky, and there is just that chance that your number analysis might be misleading for a conclusion.

If I understand your other query on radio, the “swing” votes from the GMC, PPP, and GPDP are of concern because according to Mr. Jaiteh, there is some shady deal to favor some, at the disadvantage of others. I also followed that you are asking for an open primaries as a result of the swing votes above. Agreeably that the 10 people per party per region is too small statistical data for electability test, however time is of essence, and a lot of funding will be needed to conduct a nationwide primary. In my view, none of the processes is flawless. In this case, it is the lesser of the two evils.mamma-kandeh

We all know that the Gambia comes first. The nation lost its virginity in July of 1994 through the military overthrow; since then we are clawed to tyranny. Some citizens are languishing in jail, others dead, and too many people victimized. The stakes are too high. This opportunity must be utilized. There is no single opposition that can defeat the incumbent Jammeh. The only way it can be done is a unified coalition. That requires all of us to compromise and agree to a process and way forward, going by the majority’s verdict on October 14th where all your other colleagues voted for the 10 people per party per region, I therefore ask the GDC to reconsider, as each of these party leaders, is by far a representation of their followers.

History is in the making. There is a lot more for citizens in a liberated Gambia. Any genuine Gambian must stand tall to be counted in our efforts to liberate the Gambia from the clutches of tyranny. It was the great Madiba of South Africa who once said, “It is better to lead from behind and to put others in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur. You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership.” In every contest, there must be a leader and a follower. There cannot be two head bulls in the herd; one must lead and it will be in successions of leadership, for obvious reasons. Besides the GDC have nothing to lose at all; as our liberation effort must be concerted. To insist on being chosen as a leader will pose problems, and not at all a good sign, from either the GDC or any other political party. The Gambia is bigger than any one party and/or individual.

I humbly call on the entire GDC Flag bearer, its Executive leadership, and followers, to reconsider and get back to the coalition efforts and contest the primaries slated for October 30th 2016. Whatever the outcome is, take it, and there is still chance to address your raised concerns on the irregularities. You all should be proud to do this, as it will save us from a three way race, and we all know a three way race favors only Jammeh. On that note, I thank you for giving this letter the urgency it deserve, and I know I am not too small that I cannot be listened to, and you will not be too big that you can’t listen to my expressed concern.