(JollofNews) – Nearly three hundred people, claiming to be supporters of the United Democratic Party have announced they have left to join the opposition Gambia Democratic Congress.

The group was presented at a rally in Mamuda Village on Saturday which the GDC described as their biggest rally in West Coast Region, a region where the party has not registered much support.
The new loyalists to the GDC mainly came from Kafuta, Daru Busumbala, Pirang and Sanchaba Sulay Jobe.

According to the new GDC converts, they abandoned the UDP because of the government’s ill-conceived policies and programmes for the country.

There has not been any immediate reaction from the UDP about the supposed cross-carpeting of their supporters.

Welcoming the new recruits, GDC leader Mamma Kandeh said Gambians should start putting the country first before their party or government leaders because while leaders come and go, the country stays.

“As I welcome you to GDC, I want to once again emphasise that there is no tribal issue in the GDC. What we believe in is one Gambia and one people,” Kandeh said.

He accused President Barrow of using his Barrow Youth Movement to build boreholes, gardens and mosques for his own political gains. “How can you create a movement to build boreholes when your administration could not build a single borehole for two years?” he teased. He said the president must realise that the country is too big to be carried by a movement and Barrow is now focused on seeking political gains for himself.

Kandeh claimed he even heard that there is a planned solidarity march in Basse for President Barrow to complete his five years term in office, adding, “but if they go ahead with their march…we will also stage a counter march to demand for him to step down now.”

Kandeh continued: “President Barrow should also remember that he is the president of all Gambians. He should avoid beating his chest to say he achieved his presidency through personal efforts. Without the UDP and Gambian people he would not have been known.”

Written by Omar Bah